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Borreria Hispida Descriptive Essay

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Description

Spermacoce hispida - Useful Tropical Plants

Spermacoce hispida


There is some disagreement over the correct name for this species. We are using the original name, Spermacoce hispida, which has been accepted for conservation and is treated as the correct name in the 'World Checklist of Selected Plant Families' and many other recent publications. However, some other authorities still accept Borreria hispida[

Title Plants for a Future Author Ken Fern Description Notes from observations, tasting etc at Plants For A Future and on field trips.

Borreria articularis hispida (L.) Sivar. & Manilal

Borreria hispida (L.) K.Schum.

Spermacoce avana R.Br. ex G.Don

Spermacoce mutilata Blanco

Spermacoce rigida Salisb.

Common Name: Shaggy Button Weed

General Information

Shaggy button weed is an annual to perennial, variable, creeping to erect, branched, short hairy herb, growing up to 15 cm tall[

Title Plant Resources of Southeast Asia Publication Author Website http://proseanet.org/ Publisher Year 0 ISBN Description Lots of information on the uses of the plants of SE Asia.

].
The plant is used in traditional medicine in southeast Asia, the plant being harvested from the wild.

Known Hazards Botanical References

Title Flora of China Publication Author Website http://flora.huh.harvard.edu/china/ Publisher Missouri Botanical Garden Press; St. Louis. Year 1994 ISBN Description An excellent, comprehensive resource in 25 volumes. In addition to the botanical information the flora also gives basic information on habitat and some uses. An on-line version is also available.

E. Asia - southern China, India, Malaysia, Indonesia, Philippines.

Open sandy lands at lower elevations in southern China[

Title Flora of China Publication Author Website http://flora.huh.harvard.edu/china/ Publisher Missouri Botanical Garden Press; St. Louis. Year 1994 ISBN Description An excellent, comprehensive resource in 25 volumes. In addition to the botanical information the flora also gives basic information on habitat and some uses. An on-line version is also available.

]. Behind beaches, in dry gardens, teak forests, along steep roadsides, on sandy soils, locally abundant, at elevations from sea-level up to 500 metres[

Title Plant Resources of Southeast Asia Publication Author Website http://proseanet.org/ Publisher Year 0 ISBN Description Lots of information on the uses of the plants of SE Asia.

Properties

The plant is considered to be emetic[

Title Plant Resources of Southeast Asia Publication Author Website http://proseanet.org/ Publisher Year 0 ISBN Description Lots of information on the uses of the plants of SE Asia.

The aerial parts of the plant are taken as a febrifuge[

Title Plant Resources of Southeast Asia Publication Author Website http://proseanet.org/ Publisher Year 0 ISBN Description Lots of information on the uses of the plants of SE Asia.

].
Externally, the leaves are applied in poultices to treat headache, and also to wounds or sores[

Title Plant Resources of Southeast Asia Publication Author Website http://proseanet.org/ Publisher Year 0 ISBN Description Lots of information on the uses of the plants of SE Asia.

]. A decoction of the leaves is considered an astringent and used to treat haemorrhoids[

Title Plant Resources of Southeast Asia Publication Author Website http://proseanet.org/ Publisher Year 0 ISBN Description Lots of information on the uses of the plants of SE Asia.


A decoction of the root is used as an alterative[

Title Plant Resources of Southeast Asia Publication Author Website http://proseanet.org/ Publisher Year 0 ISBN Description Lots of information on the uses of the plants of SE Asia.

]. The decoction is also used as a mouthwash for toothache[

Title Plant Resources of Southeast Asia Publication Author Website http://proseanet.org/ Publisher Year 0 ISBN Description Lots of information on the uses of the plants of SE Asia.

The seeds are considered cooling and demulcent, and are given in the treatment of diarrhoea and dysentery[

Title Plant Resources of Southeast Asia Publication Author Website http://proseanet.org/ Publisher Year 0 ISBN Description Lots of information on the uses of the plants of SE Asia.

Other Uses Propagation Add a Comment:

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Other articles

Landrina, Spermacoce hispida, SHAGGY BUTTON WEED: Philippine Medicinal Herbs

Botany
Landrina is a procumbent, branched, hairy or rough herb, 10 to 14 centimeters long. Branches are greenish or purplish, ascending, stout and 4-angled. Leaves are ovate, spatulate, or elliptic, 1 to 3.5 centimeters long, 0.8 to 1.7 centimeters wide, pointed or rounded at the tip. Flowers are 4 to 6, occurring in whorls in the axils of leaves. Calyx-teeth are linear-lanceolate. Corolla is pale blue or white, 5 to 10 millimeters in length. Fruit is a hairy capsule about 5 millimeters long. Seeds are oblong, granulate, opaque, unusually variable, 3 millimeters or less in length.

Distribution
- From the Batan Islands to Batangas and Laguna in Luzon, and in Mindoro, Panay and Basilan, in open, dry places at low and medium altitudes,
- Also occurs in India to China and Malaya.

Constituents
- Methanolic extract yielded flavonoids and amino acids.
- Various extracts of whole plant yielded alkaloids, carbohydrates and glycosides, phytosterols, fixed oil and fats, saponins, phenolic compounds and tannins, protein and amino acid, coumarins, and flavonoids.

Properties
- Roots possess properties similar to sarsaparilla.
- Considered alterative, tonic, cooling, demulcent, aphrodisiac, constipative.
- Used as antieczemic, antibacterial, antidiarrheal, antidysentery.

Parts used
Leaves.

Uses
Culinary
- In the Konkan, the plant is eaten with other herbs as vegetable.
Folkloric
- In the Philippines, leaves are brewed in decoction and used as astringent for hemorrhoids.
- In Martinique, plant is used as tonic and stimulant. Also used for hemorrhoids.
- Leaves applied to the head in cases of headache, with it cooling effect, somewhat allaying the pain.
- The seeds in confection are cooling and demulcent; used for dysentery and diarrhea.
- Seeds considered by some as aphrodisiac.
- Used as alternative therapy for diabetes.
- In Siddha medicine, seeds used to cure diarrhea; roots used as tonic.
- Used for headaches, constipation, hypertension, scabies, IBS, erysipelas, mouth ulcers, abscesses, and as antifertility medicine.

Studies
• Cardiac Benefits: Study showed BHE-treated rat hears showed improved post-ischemic ventricular function and reduced myocardial infarct size and cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Results suggest BHE has a potential as a plant-based nutraceutical for the management of cardiovascular diseases. ( 1 )
• Antibacterial: Study of extracts of Borreria hispida showed antibacterial activity against B subtilis, B pumilus, S aureus, P aeruginosa, E coli and K. pneumonia, with the methanolic extract found to be the most effective. Results supports its use as remedy for superficial bacterial and fungal infections in traditional medicine. ( 2 )
• Antioxidant: In an vitro study, a methanolic extract of whole plant of Borreria hispida yielded a high amount of flavonoids, and suggests a potential source of natural antioxidant. ( 3 )
• Antiproliferative and Apoptotic Activity / Seeds: K3, a 35 KDa protei, was purified from the seeds of Borreria hispida. The F3 protein exhibited cytotoxic activity, with dose-dependent antiproliferative and apoptotic activity against lung (A549) and cervical (HeLa) cancer cells. ( 6 )
• Constipation Activity : Study evaluated constipation activity of Spermacoce hispida using albino Wistar rats, using the extract in an irritable bowel model in lieu of loperamide. ( 7 )
• Antihyperlipidemic Activity : Study evaluated the antihyperlipidemic effect of Spermacoce hispida seed-flavonoid rich fraction by a dose-dependent study. Results showed significant reduction of total cholesterol, triglycerides, plasma phospholipids, free fatty acids, LDL cholesterol, and VLDL-C, with significant elevation of HDL. Activity was attributed to the presence of ursolic acid, quercetin, isorhamnetic, and hesperetin. ( 8 )
• Free Radical Scavenging Potential: Study e valuated in vitro free radical scavenging potential of various extracts of whole plant of Borreria hispida. The methanolic extract showed strong antioxidant activity by inhibiting DPPH and superoxide anion scavenging and iron chelating activities. It contained a noticeable amount of total phenols and can be used as an easily accessible source of natural antioxidants and as possible food supplement. ( 9 )
• Antihyperlipidemic Activity: Study e valuated an ethanolic seed extract for antihyperlipidemic activity against triton-WR-1339 induced hyperlipidemia in rats. Results showed it effectively suppressed the triton induced hyperlipidemia, suggesting a potential protective role in coronary heart disease. ( 10 )
• Anti-Nociceptive: Study e valuated an ethanolic extract for anti-nociceptive activity using an acetic acid-induced abdominal constrictions and Tail immersion models. Results showed significant analgesic potential compared to standard drug Aspirin and Pentazocine. ( 11 ) Study evaluated the analgesic activity of aqueous extract of S. hispida on theraml and chemical induced pan in adult albino mice. Results showed analgesic activity, with all test doses showing significant delayed reaction time in hot-plate method and reduced number of writhing in chemical method. ( 21 )
• Anti-Cancer / Ovarian Cancer Cell Line / Antioxidant / Leaves: Study e valuated a leaf extract for antioxidant and antiproliferative activities. The extract dose dependently inhibited growth of cell lines in human ovarian cancer cell line PA 1, and also showed to be a rich source of antioxidants. ( 12 )
• Hepatoprotective / Nitrobenzene Induced Hepatotoxicity: Study e valuated the hepatoprotective activity of an ethanolic extract of whole plant against nitrobenzene induced hepatic damage in rats. Histopathological analysis showed severe centrilobular necrosis, fatty infiltration and lymphocyte infiltration. Treatment resulted in decreased liver marker enzymes activity and lipid peroxidation levels with increase in antioxidant status. ( 13 )
• Antimicrobial / Seed Oil: Study e valuated various extracts of seed oil for antimicrobial activity. Studies on Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms reveal the methanolic extract to show significant activity compared to other solvents taken for extraction. ( 14 )
• Acute Toxcity Study / Seeds: Study e valuated the hydroalcoholic extract of seeds of Spermacoce hispida in albino wistar rats in single doses of 500, 1000, 2000 mg/kbw. No mortality or clinical signs of toxicity were observed. The LD50 and maximum tolerable dose was greater than 2000 mg/kbw. ( 17 )
• Constipation Activity: Study evaluated the constipative activity of S. hispida using albino Wistar rats in the setting of irritable bowel syndrome using the extract in lieu of loperamide. ( 18 )
• Hepatoprotective / Carbon Tetrachloride Induced Hepatotoxicity: Study of an ethanolic extract of Spermacoce hispida against CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity in rats showed significant protective effect from hepatic damage. ( 19 )
• Cardioprotective / Mitochondrial Energy Production / Seeds: Study evaluated the effects of pretreatment with S. hispida on isoprenaline-induced myocardial infarction in heart mitochondrial function in experimental rats. Results showed a protective effect which can be attributed to the activation of mitochondrial energy metabolism. ( 20 )

Godofredo U. Stuart Jr. M.D.

Borreria latifolia in Global Plants on JSTOR

Compilation
Borreria latifolia

SPERMACOCE latifolia Aubl. [family RUBIACEAE ], Hist. Pl. Guiane Fr. 1: 55, t. 19/1 (1775). Type: French Guiana, Cayenne, etc. Aublet (? P, holo.)

Borreria latifolia (Aubl.) K. Schum. [family RUBIACEAE ], in Mart. Fl. Bras. 6 (6): 61 (1888); Bremek. in Pulle, Fl. Suriname 4: 291 (1934); Hepper, F.W.T.A. ed. 2, 2: 219 (1963)

Straggling or prostrate annual herb 10–60 cm. long with bright pale yellow green stems and foliage; stems branched or unbranched, square with angles slightly to distinctly winged, glabrous or with sparse to fairly dense short hairs on the angles or stems hairy all over. Leaf-blades often red margined, elliptic, 1.2–5 cm. long, 0.8–2.9 cm. wide, acute at the apex, cuneate at the base, pubescent or ± scabrid above with tubercle-based hairs, pubescent beneath or almost glabrescent all over save for the scabrid margins; petiole 0.5–3 mm. long; stipule-sheath 1.5 mm. long, with 5–9 setae 1.5–3.5 mm. long. Flowers in axillary clusters ± 8 mm. wide. Calyx-tube pubescent, obconic, 2.5 mm. long; lobes 4, oblong to lanceolate, 1.2–2 mm. long. Corolla whitish, blue or pink; tube funnel-shaped, 5 mm. long; lobes ovate-triangular, 1.5 mm. long and wide. Filaments exserted ± 1 mm. Style exserted 2 mm.; stigma-lobes linear, 1 mm. long. Capsule ellipsoid or subglobose, 2.5–3 mm. long, wrinkled, hairy. Seeds yellow brown, ellipsoid, 2–2.8 mm. long, 1.3–1.7 mm. wide, 0.8–1 mm. thick, reticulate-rugulose, with a deep wide ventral excavation. Fig. 50/22, p. 342.

DISTR. U4 Sierra Leone, Liberia, Ivory Coast and Ghana; a native of S. America from Central America to Bolivia and West Indies but now a common casual in many parts of the world including India, Ceylon, Nepal, Malay Peninsula, Java and Australia

Intraspecific variation of insertion

Intraspecific variation of insertion/length of stamens in homostylous flowers of a new species and three other species of Borreria. an unusual case in Rubiaceae

Sandra Virginia Sobrado

Four species of Borreria subsection Latifoliae (Rubiaceae) present intrafloral variations in the insertion/length of stamens in homostylous flowers. Borreria heteranthera is described and illustrated as new species from the state of Pará, Brazil. The emended descriptions of Borreria hispida. B. semiamplexicaule and B. xanthophylla. with details on stamens morphology and insertion, are provided. The inclusion of B. xanthophylla in the subsection Latifoliae is proposed. Staminal arrangement, pollen grains and seed morphology of the four species are compared. A comparative table with ecological, palynological, and morphological features of each species is provided. In addition, Borreria semiamplexicaule is mentioned as a new record for the state of Mato Grosso, Brazil, and the lectotype of B. hispida is here designated.

Borreria subsect. Latifoliae, Borreria heteranthera, Borreria hispida, Borreria semiamplexicaule, Borreria xanthophylla, Brazil, French Guiana, stamen organization, pollen grains, seed morphology, Spermacoce, Spermacoceae, Eudicots

Full Text:

Induction of Apoptotic Effects of Antiproliferative Protein from the Seeds of Borreria hispida on Lung Cancer (A549) and Cervical Cancer (HeLa) Cell L

BioMed Research International Induction of Apoptotic Effects of Antiproliferative Protein from the Seeds of Borreria hispida on Lung Cancer (A549) and Cervical Cancer (HeLa) Cell Lines

Department of Biotechnology, School of Bioengineering, SRM University, Kattankulathur 603203, India

Received 25 July 2013; Revised 8 December 2013; Accepted 10 December 2013; Published 29 January 2014

Academic Editor: Stelvio M. Bandiera

Copyright © 2014 S. Rupachandra and D. V. L. Sarada. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License. which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Citations to this Article [3 citations]

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  • Seung-Yeon Han, Chang-Eui Hong, Hwan-Gyu Kim, and Su-Yun Lyu, “Anti-cancer effects of enteric-coated polymers containing mistletoe lectin in murine melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo,” Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry. 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
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